Smacked in the Gut by Life, Part 2: Waiting

(This article was first published on April 10, 2014 in unexpectedincommonhours.wordpress.com)

A few days ago I wrote about our three-year-old grandson B. who was diagnosed with an arteriovenous fistula (AV fistula) in the brain. (See that post here.)

B. was first taken to the children’s hospital at Erlanger in Chattanooga, TN where they did a CT scan, an MRI, and an angiogram to find out what was causing his left eye to protrude.  He was then transferred by ambulance to the Scottish Rite Children’s Hospital in Atlanta, GA where pediatric neurosurgeons made the diagnosis.  The AV fistula probably has been present since birth and is causing pressure within the brain, including behind the eye which accounts for the protrusion of the eye.  It is extremely rare in children.

B. returned to the hospital on Monday, this time to a third children’s hospital, Egleston Hospital, which is associated with Emory University in Atlanta.  His mom took this photo at Egleston. I think it’s wonderful that even in hospital he could wear his special referee shirt and have his special pillow and blanket and keep by his side his stuffed toys, a ball, and the ipad on which he listens to his favorite singing group, Daves Highway.

Ben at Egleston

On Tuesday, additional testing was done at Emory Hospital.  (That now makes 4 hospitals within less than a week’s time.)  Vascular neurosurgeons now know exactly where the fistula is located and the procedure they will use to fix it.  However, there are risks including the risk of a stroke.  But doing nothing is not an option.  Doing nothing could be fatal.  There is a window of time available, and during that window, our daughter and her husband are seeking the opinion of the world’s foremost vascular neurosurgeon, who practices medicine in New York.

Sometime within the next two to four weeks, the procedure will be done to fix the AV fistula.  As I asked before, if you read this post and are a praying person, please add B. to your prayers.  We will be eternally grateful.  We are believing that the procedure will be successful and that B. will have a normal, healthy life.  I will keep you posted…

B. playing the guitar

 

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